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Background factors in people living with HIV in Japan who switch to cabotegravir plus rilpivirine: A pilot study

  • Eisuke Adachi
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Department of Infectious Diseases and Applied Immunology, IMSUT Hospital of The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8639, Japan.
    Affiliations
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Applied Immunology, IMSUT Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Kazuhiko Ikeuchi
    Affiliations
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Applied Immunology, IMSUT Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Michiko Koga
    Affiliations
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Applied Immunology, IMSUT Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Hiroshi Yotsuyanagi
    Affiliations
    Department of Infectious Diseases and Applied Immunology, IMSUT Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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Published:September 17, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2022.09.008

      Abstract

      Long-acting therapy of cabotegravir and rilpivirine is expected to free people from the negative emotions of living with HIV associated with taking drugs, but problems such as increased number of hospital visits, lack of anti-HBV activity, and limited convenience in people with concomitant drugs have been noted. In this single-center, prospective, cross-sectional study, we investigated background factors of people living with HIV in Japan who chose cabotegravir plus rilpivirine. Forty-seven percent (36 of 76) of individuals chose this regimen, but many people living with HIV who visited the hospital once every 3 months or needed concomitant medications due to complications chose this regimen and there were no significant differences in background factors that could affect convenience between the groups of those who switched and those who did not.

      Keywords

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